Sarahlee426
Hey, y'all! 
We recently switched from a Masterbuilt smoker to a pellett smoker. We made chicken thighs and Turkey breast in it last week that came out fantastic. Today, we smoked a brisket in it for the first time...it did not come out anything like what it always did in our masterbuilt. It was slightly dry, it didn't form a great bark like usual, but it did have great flavor and a beautiful smoke ring. What could be the issue? My husband is furious that we spent $50 on a brisket and got less than stellar results. We seasoned it last night, left it in the fridge, pulled it early this morning, smoked it at 250 until 165 internal temp, then wrapped in red butcher paper until we got to 200, and put it in a cooler for an hour before we touched it. 
We have never had a smoker fail like this, so I am all ears to any and all suggestions and tips.
Thank you!!
Quote 0 0
Blindog
It looks like you did everything correctly to have a good finished product. Could it have been the quality of the brisket that you purchased?

Good luck,
Blindog
Quote 1 0
Boggypond
Was wondering if anybody was reading the forum amymore.  
Buster
Boggy Pond
Quote 0 0
bbqBob
I still read it. Really wish I could get into the archives though. So much great into within them! I sure miss the days when pages filled up quickly. Not sure where folks went. Maybe Facebook? I'd much rather use this forum than FB for things....
Quote 0 0
Blindog

I stop by everyday and look to see if anything new has been posted. Pretty quiet.
Buster and bbqBob,
It's been awhile since I've heard from ya'll. I've retired from work and the circuit. Getting too old for the all niters. I sold the Jedmaster and bought a Jambo knock-off that a friend of mine had built. I had to have something to play with. An Egg, Genuineswine and Fast Eddy just weren't enough toys. My plan is to dedicate about three weeks and a boatload pof money practicing and then go back out on the circuit to see if I still got it with stick burners. It's been a long time.
Take care...both of you. It's a good thing nobody is left to tell the stories of the 90's and 00's
Later,
Blindog

Quote 1 0
Robert
I too stop by everyday.  I was never a prolific poster, so I guess I'm continuing in that same theme.  Blindog, 275 is the new low and slow as I'm sure you know.  Get a drum to play with too.  We're still out there running the roads, just not as much as we used to.

To the OP:  I can't offer any advice on the cooker and why you didn't get the bark you were used to.  But, I can tell you some pieces of meat just don't cooperate.  Turn that brisket into chili or nachos.  Then try cooking another one.

What brand of pellet cooker?

Robert
Quote 0 0
CandySueQ
Congrats on your call in Hammond, Habitual man!  I can't believe its April and I haven't cooked YET!  Life gets in the way of BBQ.
Quote 0 0
Boggypond
Long  time since I have seen Blindog or Bob. Have retired from.cooking about to 3 years now. Dont miss the work but miss.seeing people
Seems like on the old days a page would fill.up nearly every day. Dont know where everybody went.
Quote 0 0
rayb

The following is how I cooked my last briskets. I cooked a couple of large flats on the WSM at about 240 degrees.  I took the briskets out of the refrigerator and injected them with chilled canned beef broth.  Then I sprinkled a bit of accent on each of them.  Next, I gave them a good coating of Durkee Steak Dust.  I then went over them again with Head Country’s Rub, and follow this up with some grindings of Weber’s Chicago Steak Seasoning.  These three sets of spices combined with the injected beef broth became my formula, to produce good briskets.  This formula worked well, other formulas I have tried in the past did not work as well.

When the smoker was up to temperature I put both briskets on.  One brisket went on the top grate and one on the lower grate.  The fire was built with lump charcoal and I put in a couple of chunks of oak and two chunks of hickory.   

I then cooked them until the internal temperature hit 165 degrees and at that point I pulled them out, wrapped the good and tight in aluminum foil.  I cranked up the temperature in the smoker to about 300 degrees and cooked them until the internal temperature hit 195 degrees.  Then I took them out of the smoker and wrapped them up in an old insulated (washable jacket) and let them set for three hours.  I still had the temperature probe in and made sure the internal temperature never went below 160, which it did not.

After three hours I opened them up and poured the juices that had collected in the foil, into a bowl.  I put the bowl in the refrigerator, to separate the fat.   While I was waiting for the fat to solidify on the top I sliced the briskets.  I then put small portions in pre-made Food Saver bags.   Then, after the fat was separated from the juice I removed the fat, and added the remaining excess beef broth.  I put a large spoonful of juice in each bag.  The bags were then sealed while the sliced brisket was still hot and immediately put into the freezer.  Whenever I wanted any brisket I just put the frozen bags in boiling water for 20 minutes and it tasted as good as the day I cooked it.

Now this is a very common way of cooking brisket that has been discussed on the forum almost since that beginning of the BBQ Forum.   It almost always produces very good brisket.  It seems that a lot more discussion has revolved around how to cook briskets rather than what we put in it or on it.  What I used on these briskets was just some stuff I had in the kitchen but the three items I put on the briskets produced really good results.  They became a formula when combined coupled with the injected beef broth and the result was good tasting brisket.

I would be interested in hearing from some other people about what spices you put on brisket and what you inject in brisket.  I don’t expect anyone to give all the ingredients of your formula like I did.  But I am sure that some random items would be of interest to me and others.  Your comments would provide a good working ground for people trying to develop their own formula.  

Ray Basso (re-posted from a long time ago) 

Quote 0 0
Jeff kavich
With my pellet smoker I will always inject my brisket the night before.
a mixture of beef base, beef as jus, and water.  Season just before going in smoker. 
After 2 hours of direct smoke I place in tin pan and cover.  Bring temp up to 200 degrees.  Then pull from smoker and place (still tin foil covered pan) in a moving blanket to rest. I rest the brisket for 4 hours.  If wrapped properly in the moving blanket you should still have internal meat temp around 160 degrees.
this method has not failed me yet. Tender and juicy every time.  
Quote 0 0